Thursday, January 24, 2008

Freedom FAQs -okay only one Q & A -I'm runnig low on coffee

I recently received a question from a 17 year old young man, living in the UK.

He wondered how much the government should "look after" people.

I gave him an answer I thought appropriate for an intelligent teenager who knows something is wrong with the way government is run but can't quite put his finger on it. Looking over it again-I think it's a pretty good answer to anyone who is wondering the same (if I do say so myself).
Below, I've also posted Ron Paul Rising, one of the newer movie trailer style inspirational Ron Paul videos.

Max Smithwick said...

Hi, I'm English and don't know much about Ron Paul or what he stands for, so I watched your video to get an idea. I just wanted to know if you knew what his views on welfare are? He mentions at one point that the government should not have to look after a person from cradle to coffin, which is fair enough, but to what extent does he think people should be looked after by the government?



ThatGirlTasha said...

"to what extent does he think people should be looked after by the government?"

Not at all-"helping people" is something that is done voluntarily, not by force.

When you help someone through the federal government, it is done by force; something is stolen from one person and given to the other. (literally, at gunpoint-if you don’t pay taxes you’ll be arrested)

By the time the “pie” is given to the needy person; all the slices of a very inefficient pie have been doled out to countless middlemen along the way.

So that the end result is a whole hard earned "pie" is stolen from one person and the person in need receives a piece of crust; while the government grows in its power and control over us all.

The solution then is for help to be given by church, humanitarian groups and some help can be given at the state and local levels where there are far fewer slices handed out and where the “pie” distribution can be watched over by voters and hold accountable those doing the slicing.

And at that volunteer/church/humanitarian level a whole "pie" can just be handed over without force to whoever needs it.

If you saw some of what happened during the Katrina disaster; it was a perfect example. FEMA came in and actually managed to make a disaster area worse- by preventing volunteers from getting and bringing water, splitting up families and turning doctors away all because they weren't part of the government or officially under their control.

Compare that to the lifesaving effort of the Red Cross and the Salvation Army.

Believing in freedom involves believing in people; it can seem scary but not nearly as frightening as the alternative.

-Tasha





4 comments:

dare2bfree said...

tasha ~

Great response. Hopefully he will start asking more questions as he starts figuring out that how things do work are not necessarily how they should work.

Stephanie said...

Excellent post, great analogy.

Shay said...

YAY! Another Libertarian, homeschooling, Ron Paul mama!

I will definitely come back for more.

XOXO Shay

Max Smithwick said...

What you say is fair enough, and I do believe a lot of the bureaucracy has to be cut out to help the poor get more than a crust, however there are something’s that government funding should be used to supply, and humanitarian groups can't, for instance the NHS, something we take for granted for England, most people over here can no more get their heads round you not having a free health service than Muslim women being forced to wear head scarves.

Taxes are way too high though, my dad pays 40% of what he earns which seems a tad unfair. This is not because I think paying benefits to the needy is a bad thing, just that it has gone a bit to far. People are starting to feel it is the states job to support them completely if they cannot be bothered – State funding should be kept for the last resort.

All that is needed is a complete rethink and some serious cuts.